On finding something missing in the view. NEW WORK
14 August to 2 September 2017

  1. Life of dust
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    250 x 250 mm
    $1,650
  2. The friend returns
    2017
    collage ink and pencil
    250 x 250 mm
    $1,650
  3. Ode to preservation
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    250 x 250 mm
    $1,650
  4. Ode to rubble
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    250 x 250 mm
    $1,650
  5. Ghost by the lake
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    250 x 250 mm
    $1,650
  6. Carnival by the river
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    295 x 295 mm
    $1,750
  7. The leavings
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    265 x 265 mm
    $1,650
  8. The building remembered
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    250 x 250 mm
    $1,650
  9. View from the clouds (with Sonny Shamrock in the valley)
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    250 x 250 mm
    $1,650
  10. To the architect from the land
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    250 x 250 mm
    $1,650
  11. Ghost of the architect
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    265 x 265 mm
    $1,650
  12. On the lake (after Christian Morclay)
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    265 x 265 mm
    $1,650
  13. The latitudes
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    250 x 250 mm
    $1,650
  14. Air and stone
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    265 x 265 mm
    $1,650
  15. Two days of light, Aniwaniwa
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    250 x 250 mm
    $1,650
  16. A dream of the lake
    2017
    collage
    ink and pencil
    175 x 145 mm
    $1,950

On finding something missing in the view is about architecture and demoli1on. In January this year I travelled with my brother Greg to Lake Waikaremoana to see what remained of the Aniwaniwa Visitor Centre. In September 2016 the demolition of the heritage-listed build had commenced. Designed by architect John Scott, the Visitor Centre was of incalculable significance, its unique design informed and profoundly enriched by the environment, culture and history of Te Urewera.

By January the site was fenced off to the public and almost barren, the Visitor Centre had been reduced to rubble, most of which had already been trucked away from the area. It was deeply saddening that such a taonga had been destroyed. Delving into the debris we gathered fragments of masonry and steel - a small gesture to preserve something material from the great building.

The images in this exhibition combine pencil, ink and collaged antique engravings, in addition some of the collected fragments from Aniwaniwa have been inked and impressed on each of the works - in effect, parts of the building have been printed onto these images.

The last of the rubble will be gone now and the site empty at Aniwaniwa. While John Scott's building might be missing in the view, its spirit remains and with much still to say to us - if we listen.

Brendan O'Brien
August
2017